Tag Archives: 70s

Glen Campbell tribute

This week it’s a tribute to Glen Campbell who died of Alzheimers on August 8th, aged 81.
One of the true greats of popular music, Campbell was a singer, guitarist, songwriter and TV presenter. He crossed the music divide and was highly regarded by people in the music business in other musical genres; rock legend Alice Cooper was one of his close friends.

During his 50 years in show business, Campbell released more than 70 albums, sold over 45 million records and received numerous awards. His partnership with songwriter Jimmy Webb produced some classic songs such as “Wichita Lineman”, “Galveston”, “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” and “Honey Come Back”.

He made history in 1967 by winning four Grammys in the country and pop categories. Three of his songs were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame (“Wichita Lineman” in 2000, “By The Time I Get To Phoenix” in 2004 & “Gentle On My Mind” in 2008), while Campbell himself won the Grammy Lifetime achievement award in 2012.

In the UK he had top forty singles including five top tens.
These are well known hits of his but are also my favourites. Wichita Lineman in particular is one of my all time favourite songs.

RIP Glen Campbell.

“Wichita Lineman” reached number 7 in 1969. Should have been number 1.
(Uploaded to YouTube by 2old2Rock)

“Rhinestone Cowboy” reached number 4 in 1975.
(Uploaded to YouTube by GlenCampbellVEVO)

Some ELO for the weekend

This week it’s one of my favourite bands, British band The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO). They were formed in 1970 by members of The Move; Roy Wood, Jeff Lynne and Bev Bevan. The idea was to incorporate elements of classical music in pop, adding violins, cellos and some woodwind and horns
In America, where they did better initially, they were apparently known as “the English guys with big fiddles” !
In 1972, Roy Wood left to form Wizzard.

This band with it’s very distinctive use of strings have produced some of the best quality pop songs in the 70s and 80s but somehow seemed to pass the “cool” music press by. Despite not being beloved by critics they were loved by the public, their singles doing very well and their albums in particular, selling in the many millions.
Jeff Lynne ceased with the band in 1986 and went on to produce other artists and do other things such as being part of superstar group “The Travelling Wilburys” with Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Roy Orbison & Tom Petty.
Drummer Bev Bevan continued with “ELO Part ii” and “Orchestra” and eventually sold his share of the band back to Lynne.
In recent times thanks to Jeff Lynne doing Glastonbury and other concerts, interest was rekindled and the band revisited their former hits and then produced new music as “Jeff Lynne’s ELO”, winning “Band of the Year” in 2016 at the Classic Rock, Roll of Honour Awards. It was only this year they were finally inducted into the “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2017”
Their greatest hits albums still sell very well as people realise just how good they were.

ELO had 27 top forty hits, including 15 top tens and 1 number one.
Their first hit was “10538 Overture” which reached number 9 in 1972.
Their only number one was “Xanadu” with Olivia Newton-John which stayed at the top spot for two weeks in 1980 and was from the musical film of the same name. Whilst a decent record, it is a shame that none of their other songs didn’t hit number 1 as there are loads deserving of the top spot. Just some worthy of that are “Mr Blue Sky’, “Livin’ Thing”, “Evil Woman”, “Sweet Talkin’ Woman” , “Telephone Line” and “Don’t Bring Me Down” which was their highest other hit which reached number 3 in 1979.

“Showdown” reached number 12 in 1973. One of their earliest hits and a favourite of mine. Love the violin riff throughout and the break distortion at 02:44.
(Uploaded to YouTube by TheMaster974)

“From the End of the World” wasn’t a single (why?!) but is one of my favourite tracks of theirs. It’s from the 1981 concept album “Time” which had a time travel concept about a man from 1980 going to 2095. The album is not one of their most well known, but still reached number one and is now considered to be the most influential of their catalogue due to it’s concept.

(Uploaded to YouTube by ELOVEVO)

Some Boz Scaggs for the weekend

This week it’s American singer, songwriter and guitarist, Boz Scaggs.
Scaggs had a unique bluesy voice which added character to his songs.
He had four top 40 hits in the UK including one top ten, all in the 70s.
He is probably best known for “Lido Shuffle” which funnily enough wasn’t his highest charting hit. “Lido Shuffle” peaked at 13 whereas “What Can I Say” managed number 10 earlier the same year.

However, his most famous song is probably best known sung by someone else. “We’re All Alone” was released as a B side of “Lido Shuffle” but was covered by Rita Coolidge and reached number 6 in 1977 becoming one of her biggest hits.

Here are two of his songs.

“Lowdown” reached number 28 in 1976 (number 3 in the US)
(Uploaded to YouTube by BozScaggsVEVO)

”What Can I Say” reached number 10 in 1977 (number 42 in the US)
(Uploaded to YouTube by MrB0jangles70)

The US and UK obviously had differing opinions on which was the better song!

Some Kool and the Gang for the weekend

This week it’s American funk and disco band, Kool and the Gang. The group were very popular in the 70s and 80s. Two of their songs, “Ladies’ Night” and “Celebration” have become staple songs for party nights everywhere! They had 18 top forty hits including 7 top tens.

These two tracks are not quite as well known but are great dance tracks.

“Steppin’ Out” reached number 12 in 1981
(Uploaded to YouTube by KoolAndTheGangVEVO)

“Get Down On It” reached number 3 in 1981
(Uploaded to YouTube by hej6hej6tja6)

 

Some 1979 one-hit wonders for the weekend

This week we have two massively catchy one hit wonder songs from 1979 which is my favourite year in pop. This was a massively strong year with all the biggest hitters in music active. These two songs burned brightly for their artists who couldn’t match their success again.

“Pop Muzik” by British band M was number 2 for two weeks in May 1979. It would have been a number 1 most other times but 1979 was a strong year. It was held off the top spot by “Bright Eyes” by Art Garfunkel which turned out to be the biggest selling hit that year and that number one was deposed by “Sunday Girl” by Blondie which was the 9th biggest hit that year. “Pop Muzik” was the 14th biggest hit, so not too shabby!

disco version of “Pop Muzik” by M
(Uploaded to YouTube by Clasicos de la Disco)

Next up is “My Sharona” by American rock band The Knack. This song reached number 6 in June 1979 in the UK. It didn’t make the UK 100 songs of the year
but it did top the US BIllboard hot 100 year end song list beating off competition from Donna Summer, Chic, Rod Stewart and many other famous artists. The song is famous for its very distinctive drum and guitar riff.
(Uploaded to YouTube by TheKnackVEVO)

Some Billy Ocean for the weekend

This week it’s Trinidadian British singer Billy Ocean who had a number of hits in the 70s and 80s. He is still producing music and touring today. Oh and of course I wasn’t inspired this week by a certain sitcom πŸ˜‰ πŸ˜‰

Ocean had 12 top 40 hits including 6 top tens and a number one.

“Red Light Spells Danger” reached number 2 in 1977
(Uploaded to YouTube by Disco.discotheque)

“Caribbean Queen (No More Love on the Run)” reached number 6 in 1984. My favourite song of his.
(Uploaded to YouTube by cinqo7)

Some Three Degrees for the weekend

This week it’s a really classy trio of ladies called “The Three Degrees” who were an American vocal group who had hits in the 70s.
They had 10 top 40 hits including 5 top 10s and 1 number 1.
There were a number of different line ups, but the most well known was the one with Sheila Ferguson and Valerie Holiday and then Fayette Pinkney or Helen Scott. The first song has Ferguson,Holiday and Pinkney and the second Scott instead of Pinkney as can be seen in the pictures.

The first song is one of my favourite songs of theirs on the Philadelphia International label.

“Take Good Care Of Yourself” reached number 9 in 1975
(Uploaded to YouTube by GurlGroops)

This song was their third hit on the Ariola label and showed their more disco sound then the smoother soul of the Philadelphia International label of their earlier hits. The producer for this song and others on Ariola was legendary electronic music producer, Giorgio Moroder who was most famous for producing Donna Summer’s massive hit “I Feel Love” in 1977.

“The Runner” reached number 10 in 1979
(Uploaded to YouTube by marvin kevlar)